46 Replies Latest reply on 15-Jul-2018 8:29 PM by lauradeeves

    Module 3 Discussion Thread

    teachontario.team

      What do you notice in this video with regards to ISTE Standards, 21st century fluencies and Ontario Learning Skills?

       

      How do ISTE Standards align to our Ontario Learning Skills? Does your school board define “21st Century Competencies?” Do you? What would those skills look like? What neat projects have you seen or done that help facilitate the development of these skills? Post your thoughts in the thread below.

        • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
          mattlet2002

          The Papert video could easily be a documentary into any classroom of today.  The big difference would be the clothing and the technology!  What I noticed most was the importance of those transferable skills.  The ability to apply mathematical reasoning to solve problems was evident in the video.  In looking at the TDSB's Global Competencies, I notice that competencies such as critical thinking, communication and inquiry were on display in the video.  This video would be a great one to use to address people who don't understand why coding needs to be taught and why can't things go back to the old ways.

           

          STEM and Inquiry based learning are two activities that help students to not only gain content knowledge, but more importantly, the skills to advance further in the lives.  Using coding to create musical notes and then using a Makey Makey to create the piano to play the notes is a simple way to start.  I also used jinx wood or balsa wood and had students create toy cars using hand tools.

           

          What frustrates me is seeing students progress and grow in the competencies and standards over the years as they visit the library only to be in the one class where the competencies and standards are not supported.

            • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
              donnad

              Matt, could you clarify for me your last sentence "What frustrates me is seeing students progress and grow in the competencies and standards over the years as they visit the library only to be in the one class where the competencies and standards are not supported."

              I'm not sure I understand what you mean by 'the one class.'

              Thanks

                • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                  mattlet2002

                  Global Competencies and Coding are two areas that require long term planning and exploration in order for students to develop and improve in these areas.  In order to be most successful, they need to be embraced each year by teachers.  I look at the Grade 3 students in my school who are amazing coders because their homeroom teachers support the teaching of coding and students are enthusiastic about it as a result.  I also can't imagine what they will create by Grade 8!  What happens however if they end up in a room one year where there is no support and enthusiasm for coding and teaching global competencies?  What issues could arise later on if some students have a gap in skills and others do not?  How can we push the importance of coding and global competencies as school wide tools?

                   

                  It seems like we need to start thinking about teaching coding and global competencies as a continuum the same way that we teach reading and writing.  Thanks for your question.

                    • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                      charlandl

                      I agree about that continuity.  Same goes for the curriculum, but I see the same lack in number talks or inquiry based learning.

                      • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                        lauradeeves

                        I completely agree.  I work with some amazing teachers.  But, most have not yet embraced the idea of technology supported classrooms.  I have spent the last couple of years working through lots of my own growing pains in terms of coding.  I am proud that I have done a fairly good job guiding my students through coding in a variety of subjects.

                         

                        Unfortunately, students leave my classroom, to another year, another class.  Often, they revert back to using technology only for presentations/ Word/ publications.  Not that it is a bad thing,  and I'm most certainly not knocking my colleagues' abilities.  But, I feel the work that I have done with the kids, gets lots and forgotten.

                         

                        And I also agree about the continuum for number talks and inquiry based learning.  One year where there isn't continuity, and it feels like all that has been done was for naught.  Even though I know there are still many great things done in every classroom.  But, how does one get everyone else on board?

                    • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                      aspinabr

                      I definitely agree that Papert was far ahead of his time. If you read Mindstorms, you would never guess it was written in 1980!

                    • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                      room210math

                      The ISTE Standard of Global Collaborator aligns with Ontario's learning skill of Collaboration, but on a global scale now to recognize the global competencies. I see Digital Citizen to be the Responsibility learning skill, also to recognize an additional environment within which students need to be responsible. Empowered Learner, Knowledge Constructor and Innovative Designer are the Self-Regulation and Organization learning skills. So, lots of links between the two, but updated and broadened to give students the rights and responsibilities for their own learning. 

                       

                      Many things stated in the video apply to teaching really anything. Papert describes strategies of, "subdividing the problem...make a whole out of parts", and he hits on students having a purpose for say, long division. When my students used angle degrees to rotate objects in Scratch, they had an authentic purpose for the math.

                       

                      In June, my Grade 6s used Tinkercad to design a 3-D sketch of a device that would clean the ocean of plastic. We had started looking at the plastics problem as part of Earth Day, and had identified this as a global concern. After sketching their device, students used materials brought from home to build their device. We ran out of time to test and re-build the devices.

                      • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread

                        What was evident in the video was that students were teaching students. So, student voice, collaboration, independence, self-direction, problem-solving skills are important (all Ontario learning skills).  As for the 21st competency skills, Ontario's Learning Skills are easily matched.  In my opinion, Initiative and Independent Work skills line up easily with all the 21st Competency Skills. Collaboration mirrors Global Collaborator, Responsibility and Digital Citizen, Self-Regulation & Organization and Empowered Learner/Knowledge Constructor/Innovative Design.  As another member mentioned, the main difference is a new focus on global learning and responsibility. The video,in my opinion again, highlighted that the use of technology cannot be isolated events with a prescribed outcome.  And, this is something I struggle with in the classroom. 

                         

                        The shift needs to be from the "bottom-up" to a "top-down" structure where the student becomes the "agent" of their learning rather than the "recipient" or "participant" in their knowledge (21st Competencies document). This is a big shift in pedagogy because it affects many aspects of learning: direct instruction to inquiry-based learning, requires systematic instruction and sustained practice, authentic learning (world-wide), change in assessment, change in teacher preparation programs, physical space in schools, change in professional develop, ...  My board (CDSBEO) is committed to the shift to 21st Century Competencies for both students and teachers. It has had PD in the area and plans more. An example is PD on designing learning tasks for students using Minecraft EDU, Scratch, Makey Makey and Microbit.

                         

                        I went to the Minecraft workshop with Sandra and we came away with the idea to design a task linked to the measurement unit in Grade 7 (area and perimeter).  Once again, Sandra was the driving force behind it!  (I will have to get my act together next year )  We too ran out of time and rushed the assessment at the end of the year.   

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                        • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                          donnad

                          My board might have it's own framework for 21st Century Competencies, but I couldn't find it searching on our internal site. I also don't recall it being discussed at school or receiving an email or memo regarding these skills. I find sites, ideas, and learning opportunities on my own, and often I stumble across great stuff when looking for something else.

                          I've been doing so much reading through this module, I forget which source said how important the learning space was. It could have been in the Competencies, or thelearningexchange.ca, or maybe on Brian's site. I wholeheartedly agree with the importance of the learning space. Try as a may, I cannot get my portable to look less cluttered and have enough space for the activities I want to do (e.g. video/recording questions to ask of students in Northern Canada). I had this grand plan to have space next fall for some type of MakerSpace centre. But with an additional 5 more kids to make room for not sure how I can pull that off. If any one has ideas, Please forward them to me.

                          • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                            donnad

                            I don't see the comparison of 21st Century Competencies and ON Learning Skills as straight alignments (i.e. this specific competency = this specific learning skill). I do see that they are (for the most part) reflected in our Learning Skills and Work Habits (e.g. setting goals, using resources, working with others, persevering...).

                            I struggle with deciding what does that look like for a Grade 1 student vs. a Grade 5 student, and do other teachers' interpretations mesh with mine.

                            • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                              donnad

                              Thinking out loud here, just sharing some thoughts and connections I've been having as I read through documents, sites, blogs etc. :

                              • Debug = finding & fixing errors/issues in code. (Think I might use and post this term in my classroom. It makes a great connection to growth mindset and perseverance. Hoping some of my kids that worry about making mistakes will relate to this term.)
                              • Coding = transforming actions into a symbolic language. (Writing is the act of encoding spoken language or thoughts. Reading is decoding. Isn't our orthography coding?)
                              • Somehow the grade 3s and 4s I gain have this notion that someone is to give them knowledge (aka answers) rather than they work hard to gain that 'knowledge', even though I know their previous teachers didn't teach that way. There seems to be a general lack of perseverance and resiliency. I might start the year of with some Scratch challenges, to explicitly point out when they are persevering, and learning with 'hard fun.'
                              • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                stheobald

                                A teacher that I recently met who works for the TDSB mentioned that their board has resources for teachers aligning content and integrating technology with 21st Century Competencies. The link is below. Click on Learning Experiences for Examples.

                                "This collection of resource takes each of the global competencies and creates deep learning experiences, supported by technology".

                                TDSB Global Competencies

                                 

                                I would like to respond to Matt Parson's comment regarding equity. I believe the key is in creating a shared vision -  at the classroom level, the school level (admin) and with  home and community.   As educators learning about technology is the easy part. I agree - whether or not a student receives a proper education should not depend on whose class they end up in. Building a shared vision within the school and community will ensure that all students have the same learning experiences. This is not an easy task!

                                 

                                  • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                    donnad

                                    Thanks for sharing the TDSB link. What a rich resource! They have obviously put in a lot of thought and time into that.

                                    • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                      mattlet2002

                                      I had the opportunity to attend a three day workshop for school leaders that the TDSB had about its 21st century global competencies.  It was an eye opening experience and I was introduced to many new uses for technology and importance of the global competencies.  One of the best things that I gained from the workshop was giving students opportunities to learn and present something that they are interested in learning - Genius Hour.  When we were asked what should be the next step for future workshops, almost everyone wanted to learn how to code.

                                       

                                      As a tech leader in my building, equity of technology is a constant struggle because everyone wants to use it but everyone has different plans for using it.  In one class, the teacher may use technology to teach coding and create high end videos.  In another class, the teacher may use technology to have students play games so the teacher can hold reading conferences. 

                                        • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                          donnad

                                          That tech equity thing is such an interesting topic. I do not have a Smartboard in my room, and am probably one of the few  teachers who, given the option of having one, would try to negotiate for laptops and ipads instead, as well as mice and headsets (although a consistently working projector would be nice too).  To be honest, I usually see the Smartboards being used as expensive screens to project instructions, worksheets, or movies. To be clear, I have nothing against Interactive Whiteboards. If I had the classroom space and an adequate amount of tech to put directly in the hands of learners ( and no, I am not talking about one-to-one), I would probably nag for one. But realistically, I think I can engage students  more with the technology I have, and differentiated material, through learning stations  with/without tech, etc.

                                          We use our tech as a vehicle to learn information or for accessibility (e.g. text to voice, voice to text),  as well as tech teaching us skills (e.g. needing to collaborate, thinking differently to solve problems, etc.).

                                            • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                              yolantak

                                              You bring up such a good point. I hate to tell you that I was about to get rid of my smart board if I remained within the classroom. I convinced my principal that I no longer needed it, just needed the projector. As a junior teacher, I noticed that students did not need/use the interactive board. If they wanted tech to interact, they had their own devices or our touch chromebooks. So if it helps, I think you can do so much more without it!

                                        • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                          yolantak

                                          Within the video, I can see and infer on many ISTE Standards (Empowered Learner, Knowledge Constructor, Computational Thinker, Creative Communicator), 21st C fluencies (Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Communication, Creativity) and Ontario Learning Skills (Collaboration, Initiative, Independent Work, Self-Regulation).

                                           

                                          There are similarities to the ISTE Standards and Ontario Learning Skills when you look deeper into the definitions. ISTE standards just happen to have more of an Technological and Global lens. For example, Knowledge Constructor shares the same aspects of an Independent Worker and a student who is able to Self-Regulate. Digital Citizen aligns closely to a student that demonstrates responsibility. Knowledge Constructor = Initiative and Self-Self-Regluation. Innovative Designer and Computational Thinker = Organization skills. Creative Communicator and Global Collaborator = Collaboration.

                                           

                                          Isn't the Ministry in the process of changing our Learning Skills to reflect more of the 21st Competencies?

                                           

                                          My Board has chosen to be part of the New Pedagogies for Deeper learning (NPDL). We have adopted within our practices the 6C's (Critical Thinking, Collaboration, Communication, Creativity, Citizenship, Character). We embed these 6C's within our teachings but we make sure we incorporate the 4 elements (Leveraging Digital, Learning Partnership, Learning Environments, Pedagogical Practices). I feel that this has helped me to understand more of the Global Competencies.

                                           

                                          The one large project I had my students participate in was hosted by the Learning Partnership. They had a Coding Quest project that my students loved being part of. This entailed creating an arcade game through Scratch. I think that this project (which took up most of the year) touched upon so many Global Competencies, ISTE standards and learning Skills. Students worked collaboratively, they used the Makey Makey to add a console for their games, they coded and then they launched their projects. And yes, they used the Design Thinking Process tracking their progress

                                          • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                            donnad

                                            At a workshop put on by the board, students created 'fitbits' by coding a microbit to count steps taken and to display a message of encouragement. They attached the microbit to a duct tape bracelet they also made. The kids loved this! Most running I had seen the one student do

                                            Now to figure out how to make this effective with only one microbit.

                                              • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                charlandl

                                                Like others, I notice the correlation between ISTE standards and Ontario Learning Skills.  Therefore, it shouldn't be much extra work to implement it in class...if you have the necessary tools.

                                                 

                                                For a school that doesn't have technology other than Activeboards, Ipad and laptop, what would you recommend I put on the school's wish list?  I had a chance to have LegoMindstorm in my class in May of 2017, for 4 weeks.  It wasn't long enough for me to get knowledgeable, neither for my students to get a grip of it.  By the time we were comfortable, it was time to send it to the next school.  However, some students did really enjoy it as they liked figuring out the problems, while others who are used to having the answers right away were not as keen to working at it to resolve it.

                                                  • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                    mattlet2002

                                                    You bring up a good point about wish lists.  Wish lists really need to be school wide conversations using relevant and up to date pedagogy to create a beneficial list.  I don't like the idea of hodgepodge lists, especially when budgets are tight.  If coding is a focus, then I would include technology like Lego Mindstorms, Makey Makeys and now micro:bit to supplement the coding activities with hands on tools.  I would also work to ensure that these tools were introduced early so students have the opportunity to learn about them over the years, rather than in a few months period one year.

                                                      • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                        mckinnonab

                                                        Hi Matt, I too agree about the wish lists and limited budgets.  Added to this issue, my school (7-12) has had a steady decline in enrollment for the last few years.  As a result, our access to technology (laptops) is going to be scaled back purely based on number of students. However, Sandra & I used VEX kits from the board - you just have to sign them out.  This might be an option for other people, too.  Parent councils is another option.  It never hurts to ask!

                                                        • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                          charlandl

                                                          I agree Matt that it should be school wide.  However, out of 20 classes, a select few are interested other than grades 7 and 8. So with that, I do my best.

                                                        • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                          donnad

                                                          Hi Lynn. I'm not sure if you are asking this question of me, or the whole group, but I will share my thoughts.

                                                          My school doesn't have a lot of variation in types of tech (laptops, desktops, ipads, apple TVs in most rooms, projectors, and most classes have Smartboards - an interactive whiteboard brand - but I don't have one). We don't have any of the coding robots (Beebots etc.) and I'm the only one with a microbit  (we got to keep the one we were using at our workshop :).

                                                          It's a difficult decision to make regarding tech equipment. It's quite costly with limited school budgets, and there's always the worry about what will work with our board system, and also what is its 'shelf life.' I still want a few decent headsets so that we can record voice, and mice for my laptops!

                                                          Although I think the coding robots are pretty neat, I would be worried that the novelty would run out quickly. What are other people's thoughts on those?

                                                          Late spring, I had an opportunity to request a 'set' of microbits at a reduced cost, but decided to not even ask my principal, as I felt they would probably be used by 1 or 2 classes. It's a big chunk of a small school budget. I echo Matt's suggestion that it needs to be part of a bigger conversation within the school community.

                                                          Sorry, that's probably not that helpful.

                                                        • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                          yolantak

                                                          Keep an eye out for PD that give out micro:bits for free. That's how I got mine. I went to a Fair Chance Learning | Learning Services for Educators  session and got a box there. Plus I got another one from Code to Learn  and from Coding for Kids | KidsCodeJeunesse.org. I donated a box to my school before I left.

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                                                        • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                          s_whit

                                                          What do you notice in this video with regards to ISTE Standards, 21st century fluencies and Ontario Learning Skills?

                                                          In the video, nearly 40 years old, I noticed a complete and total alignment with all three of these documents/criteria, so much so, that as I watched the video, I was in awe for several reasons... How was this video filmed when I was a student, yet I have no idea and/or experience that relates to the learning taking place in the video? How am I not in a place/position to provide students with such rich, meaningful experiences, with 20 years of teaching under my belt? In the video, while summarizing the techniques used (approximately 3:20-3:50) Papert made a comment that “Everybody knows that, but they don’t do it!” I have to disagree with him. Perhaps on a subconscious level, or when we hear it we know it, but this whole concept of ‘Part, part, whole’ didn’t really even enter my state of awareness until a recent Math training session with Ann Pigeon, yet alone an ability to apply it to teaching technology/providing rich experiences. I was like “How do I not know this???” It is so obvious and makes so much sense, but when we have in our heads that fixed mindset mentality where we‘ve been taught that we can/cannot, have/don’t have a certain type of brain, we can really set up a lot of barriers for ourselves, and I think this is particularly true in education/of educators. When we lack training and experience, when we lack funding and current technology, when so much of our job is self directed, learning, financing, there are going to be gaps. It’s learning how to close those gaps and navigate the changes... which from the video, I realized aren’t that rapidly changing...

                                                           

                                                          When considering the ISTE Standards in relation to our Ontario Learning skills, I found the overlap considerable. In particularly as I read and reviewed them, the OLS that most stood out in relation to the ISTE Standards were, Organization, Collaboration, Initiative and Self Regulation. At first, I was about to kind of glaze over the Self-Regulation piece, but then upon review, I was excited to see a very different lens presented via consideration of the ISTE Standards. I connected the Papert video as well to the OLS and being able to ‘see’ them in action was awesome... Visual learning at it’s finest!

                                                           

                                                          We often hear about 21st Century Learning competencies and our current PL generally incorporates many of these competencies, but I’m not sure there is a lot of concrete learning and understanding about what these competencies actually are/look like. That said, for those who seek clarification and understanding the information is readily available. The competencies are modeled through our professional learning, workshops, and for those who seek out additional learning opportunities, often through those experiences/networks/modules/venues. I think the more inquiry based our teaching/learning/facilitating, the more our students experience opportunities to develop these competencies. Last year, our school partnered with several other schools to hold a Maker Faire. Through this experience, regardless of participating school, age/grade or student profile, evidence of the three domains were clearly evident, as learners participated in rich, meaningful ways, and were expected to communicate about that learning, (process, trials, errors, what I would do differently next time). It was awesome to travel around, meet the Makers and hear the stories of their learning pathways.

                                                          • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                            lauradeeves

                                                            Like any teacher does, we wonder what and where our students end up doing in the future.  Wonder where the kids from this video ended up, and I wonder what type of career they pursued!  Teaching?  Technology? 

                                                             

                                                            What I noticed in the video was the ability to problem solve- I loved the little girl's "Oh Oh" when she realized her turtle had started out on an incorrect angle, and that she was able to explain the problem.  That universal "oh oh" moment that we can probably all relate to!  There were no adults around, no set of expectations, or a list of success criteria to be followed.  The students, especially those that worked with a partner, were positive and supportive of each other ("Why don't you try this.")  Their "math talk" was comfortable and accurate.  It would be interesting to know what the pre-lessons or follow-up lessons looked like (three part lessons.)  There was so much math talk that could be carried into other lessons.

                                                             

                                                            This would be great to show at a staff meeting, especially when trying to bring more teachers "on board" with technology.  My school has a very small staff and student population.  The teachers all have very strong, positive skills in the classroom- there are so many good things done.  But at this point, not many have really embraced the idea of using technology, especially in math.  Technology is often used as a center- learning games, literacy boosts, math games, final copy reports.  When used this way, teachers use the time to perhaps conference with other students.  There are rarely conferences though, about the technology being used.

                                                             

                                                            I understand how daunting using technology can be... especially when one is changing their comfortable teaching style.  Inquiry based learning- becoming a learner with the student instead of only leader, is not always easy for teachers.  I guess I'm one of the first to admit to my students that I don't always understand, but am always willing to discover with them.  (Welcome to my Minecraft journey this year!)  Having taught Kindergarten for several years, I have been able to carry my skills of inquiry based learning into my grade 5/6 class.  I will of course continue to learn and grow with my students using the resources I have- and thankfully for a small school, we are fairly well stocked for now.  I do worry though that when my students leave my classroom for new adventures, what will they take with them, and what opportunities will the receive that continues their growth and journey into technology.

                                                            • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                              donnad

                                                              I need some help. I am getting tangled in websites and different school-based resource names. I have book marked so many things I'm not sure which end is up.

                                                              I'm looking for student and teacher support in my area, Montague Township/Smiths Falls. An outreach program would be perfect, as it costs us around $200-$300/ per bus to travel anywhere close to us.

                                                              I'm getting confused with different program names: Learning Partnership, Code Club, Kids Code Jeunesse, Fair Chance...

                                                              At one point I started to think they are all the same thing as some of the links went in circles, but that can't be right.

                                                              Thanks for helping

                                                              Donna

                                                              • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                                christinavp

                                                                I absolutely loved the video - clarity of thoughts, cross-curriculuar/real-life applications, plus it reminded me of my own childhood experiences. Yes, the clothing and video quality date this clip, but it is still so applicable in our times. This is what technology should be - something that ties 'now' to the 'future.' I believe that all the Ontario learning skills can be recognized and achieved through the content of the video, and the ISTE standards seem to align very closely to those same learning skills. I actually registered with their community so that I could have a printable copy of these standards that I will go on to post in my classroom and use to guide my students!

                                                                The 21st century competencies that were outlined have certainly helped me to solidify my own goals in teaching... especially with respect to the 4Cs (page 12-13): critical thinking, communication, collaboration, creativing/innovation. One of my biggest disappointments in teaching is when the student(s) cannot use critical thinking to rationalize what they are working on (best example is "I'm done my work, what should I do next?" or when students rush through work and then say "Can you tell me what I am missing?" without stopping to consider their work independently).

                                                                 

                                                                The CDSBEO may be working on a version of “21st Century Competencies,” but we seem to operate in pockets that not everyone has access to. Social Media is great because I often see what the more technologically-avanced colleagues are doing through their Twitter accounts and then can investigate, question, and collaborate. Inquiry-based learning is huge in my world. So is student accountability and collaboration. Standards are discussed, rubrics are explained, and students are free to work at their own pace. That being said, STEAM activities are very important to me as well (please notice the 'A' as it represents the Arts!!). I bring in a variety of concepts, websites, apps, and hands-on materials to support my students' development. Here is a list of some ways students can spend extra time or how they can complete their work for formative and summative assessment (links are for more info, not to enforce buying/selling):

                                                                 

                                                                - Snap Circuits 'game' Educational STEM Toys | Snap Circuits | Elenco Electronics

                                                                - Minecraft EDU edition (was used after we read Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl - students created an underground community for the animals) Homepage | Minecraft: Education Edition

                                                                - my personal version of a 'breakout box' where teams work on clues to figure out 4-6 lock combinations and work as a class towards the 'prize' inside the box (camera introduce our blogging unit; movie was culmination of read-aloud and Minecraft activity; maple sugar to introduce First Nations' harvesting of sap...) Breakout EDU I don't belong, I just am basing my own work on their model

                                                                - Lego robotics (build, then control creation by laptop/programming) Home - Mindstorms LEGO.com

                                                                - Scratch (coding) Scratch - Imagine, Program, Share

                                                                - Recycling bin diving to create 'art' - Google "recycling art projects" for some ideas

                                                                - Open-ended tasks that sound like this: "Make a chair out of newspaper that can support your weight" (then I stand back and watch their learning skills take over, giving the occasional suggestion)

                                                                 

                                                                Many of the tasks I bring in are not part of our board's PD, nor are they financially covered by the board. These are things that I have been introduced to via Twitter followings, personal interest, or the activities of my family. If anyone wants me to explain more about the bullet list ideas, please feel free to question me on it!

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                                                                  • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                                    donnad

                                                                    Thanks for all these suggestions! How on earth do you have the time and energy to do all that.

                                                                    Loved the 'recycling bin diving' art, and the newspaper chair.  And your Breakout introducing units is brilliant. Did you say you do that whole class? Their website suggests 8-15 kids pee group, which sounds like a nightmare to me. I bought some low-tech versions from TPT and had 3-4 kids in each group.

                                                                    I too personally subsidise class resources and PD.

                                                                      • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                                        christinavp

                                                                        I set my class up using playing cards (diamonds, hearts, spades, clubs) and randomly passed out a card to each. There was no behaviour issues in my setup, although they do have so many interpersonal struggles! This really seemed to level the playing field and made them want to work together! I had mini-pylons to pass out when one group successfully opened one lock (and publicly announced that task was no longer necessary to complete).

                                                                        So, yes, it was whole-group working towards one reward - but the challenge (bragging rights) came in who could gain the most pylons

                                                                         

                                                                        As for time, I am cross-curricular whenever I can! I feel that saves me enough time to dawdle in the areas of interest!

                                                                        Thanks for the reply and questions!

                                                                      • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                                        lauradeeves

                                                                        Are you in Perth Christina?  I was interested in our thoughts about STEAM education- great idea.  And I completely agree about the "pockets" that not everyone has access to.  Sometimes one really has to work at being included, or up to date with what is going on in other parts of the board.

                                                                      • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                                        etrotechaud

                                                                        I couldn’t help but laugh when Seymour spoke about long division!  It is the bane of my existence…..”why do we need to know this”…..indeed. There were a lot of connections from the video to our Ontario Learning Skills, ISTE Standards and 21st century fluencies.  Watching the two girls working on the song – collaboration…watching them working together to create a piece of music.  I was taking with how the one student looked at her mistake and could determine what happened and how to correct it – using resilience and critical thinking. Students were engaged and able to work independently, seeking solutions to the problems they encountered. 

                                                                         

                                                                        My current school board uses Exit Outcomes (Characteristics and Skills) to define 21st century skills/competencies. It is the hope that every student leaves the school division having the following characteristics:

                                                                        • Collaborative
                                                                        • Globally Aware
                                                                        • Goal-oriented
                                                                        • Innovative/Creative
                                                                        • Resilient 

                                                                        And skills:

                                                                        • Academically Diverse
                                                                        • Critical Thinkers
                                                                        • Digitally Fluent
                                                                        • Effective Communicators
                                                                        • Ethical Decision-makers

                                                                        Here are the pdf links for anyone interested.

                                                                        https://www.ocdsb.ca/UserFiles/Servers/Server_55394/File/Our%20Schools/Exit%20Outcomes/Characteristics.pdf

                                                                        https://www.ocdsb.ca/UserFiles/Servers/Server_55394/File/Our%20Schools/Exit%20Outcomes/Skills.pdf

                                                                         

                                                                        When I look at 21st century competencies I find myself always looking at critical thinking.  I like to use brain teasers like Rebus puzzles to open their minds, thinking outside the box so to speak.  There have been some great escape room activities that I’ve seen to help students – sort of a neat take on the escape room concept but in the classroom. Old school board games like Battleship, Pandemic, Chess, Catan, Clue, etc. provide opportunity to teach collaboration, strategy, goal setting, etc. I also use simple activities like “would you rather”  and “how is a ____ like a _____” to help students with their critical thinking – no right or wrong answers, you just have to justify your response. 

                                                                        • Re: Module 3 Discussion Thread
                                                                          cmoo16

                                                                          The Seymour Papert video represents many of the best things in education....engagement, cooperation, one-on-one assistance (peer to peer), perseverance, problem solving, self-directed learning, creativity, and connections between subjects. This is why they are also reflected in the Learning Skills, ISTE Standards and the 21st Century Competencies.

                                                                           

                                                                          The board I work for has provided a great deal of PD to promote and encourage the use of technology in the classroom, however there has not been much about the 21CC document (to my knowledge).  For me the most important 21CC is Global Citizenship (being a good citizen) and I talk about this when it comes up in my classroom. As for the other Competencies...I have found it difficult to achieve many of them. I do not have enough devices to share, the devices are not reliable ( I am constantly troubleshooting), and I am not good at/or comfortable with, designing actives that integrate technology and curriculum expectations that I can assess and evaluate (sorry to the previous poster about not everyone onboard...sadly, I'm one of the few people that use technology at my school for things other than word processing, presentations, and showing videos). My school is about to change over the library to a Learning Commons (equipped with osbots) and I am looking forward to opportunities that will arise from this!